Articles

  • Protecting Your Healthy Smile while Wearing Braces

    While you are wearing braces, it is essential that you take care of your teeth and gums. This brochure explains why and how.
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  • What Are Canker And Mouth Sores?

    Mouth irritations and oral lesions are swellings, spots or sores on your mouth, lips or tongue. Although there are numerous types of mouth sores and disorders,
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  • What Is Tooth Sensitivity?

    Tooth sensitivity is a common name for dentin hypersensitivity or root sensitivity. If hot, cold, sweet or very acidic foods and drinks, or breathing in cold air, makes your teeth or a tooth sensitive or painful then you have sensitive teeth.
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  • Tooth Anatomy

    What Are the Different Parts of a Tooth
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  • Bruxism: Signs And Symptoms

    If you find yourself waking up with sore jaw muscles or a headache, you may be suffering from bruxism.
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  • Developing Teeth: Moving From Primary To Permanent

    Because there are more permanent teeth than primary teeth, the permanent premolars come in behind the primary molars.
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  • Illustrations: How A Tooth Decays

    Enamel is the hard outer crystal-like layer. Dentin is the softer layer beneath the enamel. The pulp chamber contains nerves and blood vessels and is considered
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  • Should You Have Your Wisdom Teeth Removed?

    A few people are born without wisdom teeth or have room in their mouths for them, but like Jen and her brother, many of us get our wisdom teeth taken out during our college years. And like Patrick, many of us are first alerted to the problem when our wisdom teeth don't emerge (erupt) into the mouth properly because there is not enough room for them to fit.
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  • Thrush Candidiasis

    Thrush is the common name for a mouth infection caused by an overgrowth of the Candida fungus, which normally lives in many people's mouths. It is a surface infection that can affect the corners of the mouth, the insides of the cheeks, the tongue, palate and throat. Thrush is a common infection in babies. A newborn may acquire the Candida fungus during delivery, if its mother had an active vaginal yeast infection. Symptoms of thrush usually follow within 7 to 10 days after birth.
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  • Caring for Your Implant

    Tooth implants have been used successfully for many years. Your implant should last for a very long time if you take the following points to heart.
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  • What Is Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJ)?

    TMJ, or temporomandibular joint disorder, means that the hinge connecting the upper and lower jaw isn't working properly. This hinge is one of the most complex
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  • What are Cavities

    Cavities is another way of saying tooth decay. Tooth decay is heavily influenced by lifestyle, what we eat, how well we take care of our teeth, the presence of fluoride in our water and toothpaste. Heredity also plays a role in how susceptible your teeth may be to decay.
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  • Mouth Guards and Maintenance

    Following these maintenance techniques will keep the integrity of your mouth guard intact and your mouth safer.
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  • Important Reasons for Mouth Guards

    Learn to protect your mouth from the common and often times severe dental injuries that can occur during sports.
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  • What are Sports Mouth Guards

    Sports guards, mouth guards and mouth protectors are different names for the same thing: a device worn over your teeth that protects them from blows to the face and head. Mouth guards are an important piece of athletic equipment for anyone participating in a sport that involves falls, body contact or flying equipment. This includes football, basketball, baseball, soccer, hockey, skateboarding, gymnastics, mountain biking - any activity that might result in an injury to the mouth.
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  • What Is Dry Mouth?

    Dry mouth means you don't have enough saliva, or spit, to keep your mouth moist. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while, especially if you're nervous
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  • Dry Mouth

    Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, upset or under stress. But if you have a dry mouth most of the time, it can be uncomfortable
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  • Can Medications Have An Effect On My Oral Health?

    Yes, medications can have oral side effects - dry mouth being the most common. Be sure to tell your dentist about any medications that you're taking.
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  • Tooth Discoloration

    Your teeth can become discolored by stains on the surface or by changes in the tooth material.
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  • Kids Toothpaste, Toothbrushes and More

    So many toothpastes are on the market today, choosing one can be confusing. When buying toothpaste for your child, look for one that contains fluoride and tastes good. Some toothpastes also are approved by the American Dental Association (ADA). The ADA Seal of Acceptance means that the manufacturer has provided data proving that the toothpaste is safe and effective. Some manufacturers choose not to seek the ADA seal of approval. So, toothpastes without the ADA seal also may be safe and work well, but their performance has not been evaluated by the ADA.
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  • Importance of Childhood Oral Hygiene & the Role of Parents

    The foundation for healthy permanent teeth in children and teenagers is laid during the first years of life. Poor diet, poor habits of food intake and inadequate toothbrushing habits during the first 2 years of life have been shown in several studies to be related to tooth decay in children. The development of caries in primary teeth further increases the risk of developing caries in permanent teeth.
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  • Diastemas and Treatment Options

    Diastema is the medical term for spaces between teeth. Though typically harmless, many treatment options exist to correct the condition.
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  • Bringing Teeth into Alignment with Orthodontic Treatment

    Understand how teeth become crooked and your corrective options.
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  • Why Your Child May Need a Space Maintainer

    Early tooth loss may require a space maintainer which allows the permanent tooth to grow in properly.
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  • Diabetes and Oral Health

    During the past 10 years, much research has been undertaken on the link between diabetes and periodontal disease.
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  • Oral Health and Your Heart

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a disease involving the heart and blood vessels. It's the No. 1 cause of death and disability in the United States today, with almost 700,000 Americans dying of heart disease each year. That represents almost 29% of all deaths in the United States.
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  • Bad Breath and Its Relationship to Oral Systemic Diseases

    Learn how bad breath may be a sign of something more serious in the body.
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  • Better Oral Health May Mean Better Overall Health

    Improper oral care may lead to plaque buildup and plaque formation may lead to gingivitis, which in some patients may progress to periodontitis, a more severe form of gum disease.
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  • Oral Health And Overall Health: Why A Healthy Mouth Is Good For Your Body

    Taking good care of your mouth, teeth and gums is a worthy goal in and of itself. Good oral and dental hygiene can help prevent bad breath, tooth decay and gum disease—and can help you keep your teeth as you get older.
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  • The Importance of Dental Implant Care

    Good oral hygiene is critical in caring for your implant. It takes special effort to maximize plaque bacteria removal every day.
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  • Soft Tissue Injuries

    The soft tissues in the mouth are delicate and sensitive, and when they are injured, it can be very painful. Soft tissues, which include the tongue, cheeks, gums and lips, can be injured when you accidentally bite down on them, if you fall, are in an accident, or if you put food in your mouth that is too hot. Chewing on hard objects also can damage soft tissues.
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  • Tooth Sensitivity General

    Tooth sensitivity is something that affects a number of people. It is often caused by eating or drinking something hot, cold, sweet or acidic. Under normal conditions, the underlying dentin of the tooth (the layer that immediately surrounds the nerve) is covered by the enamel in the tooth crown, and the gums that surround the tooth. Over time, the enamel covering can get thinner, thus providing less protection. The gums can also recede over time, exposing the underlying root surface dentin.
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  • Cold Sores And Fever Blisters

    Cold sores and fever blisters are caused by the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a virus that passes from person to person by direct contact...
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  • Canker Sores (Aphthous Stomatitis Or Recurrent Mouth Ulcers)

    This disease causes painful, round ulcers to develop on the linings of the cheeks and lips, the tongue or the base of the gums.
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  • Is It Your Jaw? A Symptoms Checklist For TMD

    Do you notice clicking or popping when you open your mouth? Is it difficult or painful to open your mouth? Does your jaw occasionally lock, so it is stuck open or closed? If so, you should see your dentist for a consultation and examination. You may have a temporomandibular disorder (TMD). These disorders include problems of the chewing muscles, the jaw joint (called the temporomandibular joint or TMJ), or both.
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  • Treatment Of Temporomandibular Disorder

    Just as there are no established guidelines for diagnosing temporomandibular disorder, there also is no single best treatment. Most experts agree that...
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  • Dislocation of the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ)

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ), located just in front of the lower part of the ear, allows the lower jaw to move. The TMJ is a ball-and-socket joint,
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  • Temporomandibular Disorders TMDs

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) describe several problems that affect your temporomandibular joint (TMJ), or jaw joint, and the muscles of the face that help you to chew. If you place your fingers just in front of your ears and open your mouth, the movement you feel is your TMJ. It is a small ball-and-socket joint consisting of the ball, called the condyle; the socket, called the glenoid fossa; and a small, fibrous disk, which acts as a shock absorber between the ball and socket.
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  • What Is Periodontal Disease?

    If your hands bled when you washed them, you would be concerned. Yet, many people think it's normal if their gums bleed when they brush or floss. In a 1999 study, researchers at the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) found that half of Americans over 30 had bleeding gums.
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  • What Is Gingivitis Signs and Symptoms

    Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums and is the initial stage of gum disease and the easiest to treat. The direct cause of gingivitis is plaque - the soft, sticky, colorless film of bacteria that forms constantly on the teeth and gums.
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  • Gingival Flap Surgery

    Gingival flap surgery is a procedure in which the gums are separated from the teeth and folded back temporarily to allow a dentist to reach the root of the..
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  • Gingivitis

    People with gingivitis have inflamed gum tissue around their teeth, caused by bacteria found in dental plaque. Normal, healthy gums should be firmly attached to
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  • Periodontal Disease: Causes and Prevention

    Periodontitis is a term used to describe a group of conditions that involves inflammation of the gums and other structures that support the teeth. Periodontitis is caused by bacteria found in dental plaque and often, but not always, starts as gingivitis.
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  • Periodontal Disease: What You Don't Know Can Hurt You

    It is estimated that 35.7 million Americans are living with a bacterial infection of the gums known as periodontal disease. This infection attacks the tissue that keeps your teeth attached to your gums.
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  • Debridement

    Debridement is the removal of excessive amounts of plaque and tartar from your teeth.
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  • What Are The Stages Of Gum Disease

    Gum disease is an inflammation of the gums that can progress to affect the bone that surrounds and supports your teeth. It is caused by the bacteria in plaque, a sticky, colorless film that constantly forms on your teeth. If not removed through daily brushing and flossing, plaque can build up and the bacteria infect not only your gums and teeth, but eventually the gum tissue and bone that support the teeth. This can cause them to become loose, fall out or have to be removed by a dentist.
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  • What Is Plaque?

    Plaque is a sticky, colorless film of bacteria and sugars that constantly forms on our teeth. It is the main cause of cavities and gum disease, and can harden
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  • What Is Tartar?

    Tartar, sometimes called calculus, is plaque that has hardened on your teeth. Tartar can also form at and underneath the gumline and can irritate gum tissues.
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  • What Is Good Oral Hygiene

    Maintaining good oral hygiene is one of the most important things you can do for your teeth and gums. Healthy teeth not only enable you to look and feel good, they make it possible to eat and speak properly. Good oral health is important to your overall well-being.
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  • Toothbrush Care And Replacement

    To keep your toothbrush and yourself healthy, make sure you let it dry out between uses. Toothbrushes can be breeding grounds for germs, fungus and bacteria, which after a while can build up to significant levels. After using your toothbrush, shake it vigorously under tap water and store it in an upright position so that it can air out.
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  • How To Brush - Teeth Brushing Techniques

    Proper brushing takes at least two minutes – that's right, 120 seconds! Most adults do not come close to brushing that long. To get a feel for the time involved, try using a stopwatch. To properly brush your teeth, use short, gentle strokes, paying extra attention to the gumline, hard-to-reach back teeth and areas around fillings, crowns or other restoration.
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  • How To Floss - Flossing Tips

    Proper flossing removes plaque and food particles in places where a toothbrush cannot easily reach – under the gumline and between your teeth. Because plaque build-up can lead to tooth decay and gum disease, daily flossing is highly recommended.
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  • Taking Care Of Your Teeth

    Thanks to better at-home care and in-office dental treatments, more people than ever before are keeping their teeth throughout their lives. Although some diseases and conditions can make dental disease and tooth loss more likely, most of us have a good deal of control over whether we keep our teeth into old age.
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  • Smart Snacks For Healthy Teeth

    Sugary snacks taste so good – but they aren't so good for your teeth or your body. The candies, cakes, cookies and other sugary foods that kids love to eat between meals can cause tooth decay.
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  • Pericoronitis (Infection Near Wisdom Tooth)

    Your wisdom teeth (third molars) usually start to erupt (enter your mouth) during late adolescence. Sometimes, there's not enough room for them
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  • What Are Wisdom Teeth?

    Wisdom teeth are the last molars on each side of the jaws. They are also the last teeth to emerge, or erupt, usually when a person is between 16 and 20.
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  • Pericoronitis

    Wisdom teeth do not always emerge (erupt) into the mouth properly because there may not be enough room in the mouth for them to fit.
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  • Fluorosis

    If you consume too much fluoride as a young child, the extra fluoride can disrupt the formation of the enamel (outer part) of your permanent teeth and lead to..
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  • Cheilosis/Cheilitis

    Cheilosis (also called cheilitis) is a painful inflammation and cracking of the corners of the mouth. It sometimes occurs on only one side of the mouth, but usually involves both sides.
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  • Sialedenitus

    The salivary glands contain a network of ducts through which saliva flows into the mouth.
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  • Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a complex, vexing condition in which a burning pain occurs that may involve your tongue, lips or widespread areas of your mouth
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  • Keys to Controlling Bad Breath

    Treat bad breath with these simple tips and learn how to prevent future occurrences.
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  • Bad Breath: Do You Have It? You May Not Know You Do

    Avoiding a few common foods and bad habits in this list could help end your bad breath.
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  • Bad Breath (Halitosis)

    Bad breath (also known as halitosis) is breath containing an unpleasant odor.
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  • What are dental crowns and tooth bridges

    Both crowns and most bridges are fixed prosthetic devices. Unlike removable devices such as dentures, which you can take out and clean daily, crowns and bridges are cemented onto existing teeth or implants, and can only be removed by a dentist.
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  • Apicoectomy

    Your teeth are held in place by roots that extend into your jawbone. Front teeth usually have one root.
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  • Abscess

    An abscess is a limited area of pus formed as a result of a bacterial infection.
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  • Mouth-Healthy Eating

    If you want to prevent cavities, how often you eat can be just as important as what you eat. That's because food affects your teeth and mouth long after you
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  • Dental Caries (Cavities)

    Dental caries is the medical term for tooth decay or cavities. It is caused by acid erosion of tooth enamel.
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  • All About Cavities

    To understand what happens when your teeth decay, it's helpful to know what's in your mouth naturally.
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  • Bruxism (Teeth Grinding)

    Bruxism is clenching or grinding your teeth, often without being aware that your are doing it. In the United States, bruxism affects an estimated 30 to 40 million children and adults.
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  • Cracked Tooth Syndrome

    Unlike teeth with obvious fractures, teeth with cracked tooth syndrome usually have fractures that are too small to be seen on X-rays
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